University of Louisville Magazine

SUMMER 2017

The University of Louisville Alumni Magazine: for alumni, faculty, staff, students and anyone that is a UofL Cardinal fan.

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4 6 | L O U I S V I L L E . E D U "It just seemed like the students wanted to do more." That's what law professor Goldburn Maynard, Jr. said when asked about the creation of an Estate Planning and Elder Law (EPEL) program at Brandeis Law. The idea for "doing more" started in Maynard's spring 2016 elder law class. After the students in that class completed assignments that included development of a Medicaid primer, a guide to advanced care directives and a symposium on aging, they wanted to find ad- ditional ways to help senior citizens. Maynard wanted to help, too. "Most of the law faculty here are on the lookout for opportunities to foster student engagement in the community, and to pair them with working professionals," Maynard said. "So this seemed like an ideal LAW Elder law initiative is powered by students Assistant Professor Goldburn Maynard leads a Brandeis Law course on estate planning and elder law. fit especially as our nation's aging population faces new, challenging legal issues." To formalize the EPEL program, Maynard worked with the school's dean and the Office of Professional Development and, later, he estab- lished an advisory board comprised of legal practitioners. There were about 60 law students involved in EPEL the first year. For 2017, the EPEL students have been focusing on three areas: assisting Louisville-area refugees with wills and power of attorney; helping legal guardians understand their rights and obligations; and advocating for Kentucky laws that would protect senior citizens who might be in a situation where a family member is taking advantage of them financially. Maynard said most of the active work is done by the students during class time. "This entire program is powered and managed by the students," he said. A study at the School of Nursing is examining the cultural and religious influences on the experiences of Muslim cancer survivors living in the United States. Findings will be used to develop religious and culturally sensitive interventions to improve quality of life and health outcomes. Funded by more than $29,000 in grants from the American Nurses Foundation and the Oncology Nursing Society Foundation, the study is led by Assistant Professor Fawwaz Alaloul and focuses on NURSING PROFESSOR RESEARCHING EXPERIENCES OF MUSLIM CANCER SURVIVORS Alaloul Muslims of African, Middle Eastern and South Asian descent who reside in the United States. Health care providers' lack of understanding of Muslim cancer experiences within the context of culture can create barriers that may interfere with health outcomes, Alaloul said. For example, prior research has shown that some Muslim cancer patients use herbs and other dietary supplements to treat disease or manage symptoms and they do not share this information with health care providers. The supplements might interact with prescribed medication, adversely impacting treatment outcomes. Patients might also refuse to take medications that contain swine-derived gelatin because Muslim law forbids the consumption of pork and they do not disclose this to their providers. To see if you qualify to participate in the study, contact Alaloul at fawwaz. alaloul@louisville.edu or 502-852-8396.

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